Glitter-fish.com

Refresh! Dyeing old towels.

Refresh! Dyeing old towels.

Refresh! Dyeing old towels.

image

I started with a couple of tired looking old towels that had become stiff and faded with age, and even had developed a few small holes.

image

First up, was a couple of hours soaking in my trusty softening / color setting solution.

This consists of hot tap water one cup of Epson salt and 2 cups white vinegar.
Use enough water that the fabrics can swim freely. A large amount of water would require a doubling of the vinegar.

image

My sweet WonderWoman pants make everything possible.

image

Fish was keeping me company with her bone. Also – check out that form.

image

After soaking and laundering as usual, I was ready to dye my newly softened towels. If you are going to dye them right away, skip the dryer. Fabrics need to be wet (wrung out well) before being placed in to the dye bath, to maximize color absorption.
**Dye can used in the washing machine, but I opted to do a dye bath in the sink.**

I protected the epoxy finish and clear caulking around my sink by simply using packing tape along the inside rim and a single layer on the outside of the sink perimeter. I protected the tiles and grout by lining up a few paper bags behind the faucet and pulled my blinds all the way up. I used about 3/4 of the bottle of Rit dye “Flame”.

image

I filled the sink with enough water that my 2 towels could freely swim around. I boiled a large pot of water,  and used the hottest setting on the tap. I added the dye and stirred it to fully disolve, then added my already wetted towels. I stirred them around for about five minutes, then added a handful of Epson salt. I stirred the water almost constantly to keep the fabrics from getting streaks. I stirred, gently flipped and flattened the fabrics throughout.

image

image

My husband had a shirt that had a slightly pink hue from being accidently washed with something red. He wanted to throw it in the dye bath, but did not wet it first.  The level of color was far less intense than was more of a salmon color than fire orange.

image

After about 45 minutes,  I squeezed everything out and put them in my laundry pan. I drained the water and rinsed the sink. I transfered the fabrics from sink to pan twice, rinsing in cold water and squeezing the excess water out each time. I refilled the sink with hot tap water and added 2 cups white vinegar and 1 cup Epson salt. I left them to soak about an hour. I gave them a cool water rinse,  wrung them out and laundered them on cool water cycle and medium dryer.

image

Remove all protective measures, drain the sink and clean with dish soap, bleach,  or your favorite cleaner.

image

Now the towels were ready to be cut up for my next project. Unpapertowels – tutorial coming soon.

image

I WOULD AVOID USING THIS METHOD IN ANY TYPE OF SINK OTHER THAN STAINLESS STEEL.

Question? Comments? Dastardly Plans?

%d bloggers like this: